MENU
component-ddb-728x90-v1-01-desktop

Jackson County Vector Control keeping mosquitoes at bay

Jackson County Vector Control keeping mosquitoes at bay

Workers at Jackson County Vector Control, are separating mosquitoes that genetically carry deadly diseases, to send off to the lab at Oregon State University.

They are testing the bugs to see if they are carrying viruses like West Nile.

"This is the time of year where we usually see West Nile virus and other diseases," says Jim Lunders, the manager and biologist at the control center.

Early Tuesday morning, crew members went out to spray an area near Bear Creek.

Lunders says throughout Jackson County, there are about 60 traps to monitor the mosquito population.

Near Bear Creek, there was a 50% rise in adult mosquitoes.

"this is the time of year where we usually see West Nile virus and other diseases."

"We want to get in there and make sure we suppress those mosquito numbers now before we have virus circulation."

That's good news for Estefania Ruiz, who tends to get too much attention from the blood suckers.

"Every time I go out, I just wake up with more mosquito bites everyday," says Ruiz.

She's also worried about what they carry.

"It does concern me that I can get a disease or something like that," says Ruiz.

Lunders says mosquito borne diseases like West Nile and Zika, have yet to pop up in Jackson County.

He also urges everyone to follow the three D's:

Dump standing water, dress in long loose fitting clothing, and defend by using repellent.

"The sooner we identify the virus is in the area, the sooner we can get the information out to the public so that they can protect themselves," says Lunders.


Trending