Female beekeepers creating a buzz in Ashland

Organizated by the Klamath Basin Beekeepers Association and Cascade Girl, there were about 35 people in attendance for the second half of the Oregon Honey Festival in Ashland. (Jennevieve Fong / News 10)

Eight women shared their personal stories in beekeeping, touching on both the professional and hobbyist aspects of the field.

Organizated by the Klamath Basin Beekeepers Association and Cascade Girl, there were about 35 people in attendance for the second half of the Oregon Honey Festival in Ashland.

"I think it's a pretty mixed bag," nomadic beekeeper Stephanie Taylor said. "I think there's some beekeepers here with lots of experience, but I also think that there's people who are just getting into beekeeping."

At the conference, guests were able to hear from a selection of professional beekeepers, scientists, authors and educators.

As one of the first women to graduate from a university program in commercial beekeeping, Taylor said every person can do their part help out the bee population.

"I strongly suggest just planting for the pollinators and sharing with friends," Taylor said. "Getting a bunch of friends together and talking about what you can do to change your garden to make it a pollinator friendly."

During the event, Taylor shared her personal experience of winging her way between New Zealand and Canada for commercial beekeeping.

The goal of the sixth annual Oregon Honey Festival is to celebrate all things honey and the importance bees play in the world.

"I'm learning that there's lots of beekeepers here in southern Oregon," Taylor said. "They're all doing their part to help out."


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